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“The surprising truth about what motivates us”

As you follow this enlightened overview on human motivation, ask yourself, do I want my people to just clean faster and work harder … OR do I want my techs to work smarter and leave the customer enamored with my company? If you can invest just 10 minutes you’ll be a better manager and quite possibly even a better person. Let us know what you think.

Bill Yeadon

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2 Responses to “The surprising truth about what motivates us”

  1. Mike October 4, 2011 at 11:40 PM #

    This book got me thinking about how I should pay my employees. His research suggests that paying people more money for creative (sales?) work would not increase production, and that instead you should focus on bringing more autonomy, mastery, and purpose to an employee while paying them a decent wage. Your thoughts?

  2. BurdicksCleaning October 6, 2011 at 1:08 PM #

    Mike,

    I would LOVE to know more about the psychology behind this. We have played with and explored with several compensation structures.

    We’ve tried non tradtional pay structures thinking that would be the key….and we haven’t found the right formula yet. I know about the research that supports recognition and autonomy. “They” say most employees aren’t motivated by pay, but rather the work environment and that they feel like they make a difference and are important etc.

    I have left great paying jobs because the BS was not worth it and stayed at low paying jobs becasue I liked it, had fun and felt vauled. There is something to this, but we are finding it hard to acheive when being owner operated and wanting things done a certian way because they have been done that way for so long.

    It’s hard to teach an old dog new tricks and be open to doing things a different way even if it may be better. I wonder if it’s so hard to do because then it feels like we are giving up control of our own company by giving up the procedures that we created and implemented in favor of something that an “employee” came up with? Having to admit someone else has a better, more efficient way. I’m all about streamlining, but can see where this is a hard thing to give in to for John. This business is his baby, and in a way giving up something he came up with in favor of something an employee suggests is like admitting his way wasn’t good. Hard for many of us to do!

    Hmmm….I think I have a new topic to explore in my next dispatch.

    Meg

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