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Switch places with the Customer

If while performing the job you just “bang it out”, you will not separate yourself in the least from your average competitor. As SFS members learn in our Strategies for Success seminar, you must DRAMATICALLY exceed the customer’s Baseline Expectations. Achieving this goal should include some creativity. Take this technique for example.

When I’m cleaning in a customer’s home I try to look at the room as if I was sitting in their chair or couch. This way I view (and can correct) what they see on a daily basis. If I know they have small children I’ll even sit on the floor to view things I might otherwise overlook.

I can’t resist asking here: “What would a technician need to do “to get the customer’s viewpoint” while cleaning their bedroom? Or what about the client’s bathroom?” 🙂  Seriously though, the point above is well taken. This is really just “Putting on the Customer’s Eyeglasses” taken to the logical conclusion. Many times while standing behind the wand you can’t see what the customer does when they are seated. After all, you do spend most of your time at home sitting down, right? So next time you are working in the customer’s home, try to ‘get down to their level”. Just don’t use this idea as an excuse to take a break!

Steve

P.S. What areas do your customers typically nitpick over?  Share your comments below.

P.P.S. One gentle request. Remember that this free QuickTIPS service depends on all our members sharing their Techniques, Ideas, Procedures and Systems. (Cute acronym, huh?) So please, drop us a line at sfs@StrategiesForSuccess.com or go to our on line form to submit your quickTIPS

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2 Responses to Switch places with the Customer

  1. jacknewk September 16, 2009 at 8:06 PM #

    I tell my workers when cleaning up a smoke and fire loss that they can do the best job in the world but if a window or mirror is not cleaned or cleaned badly everyone will notice, if it’s cleaned well no-one will notice, our goal then is to clean till no-one notices.

  2. Steve Toburen September 18, 2009 at 8:12 AM #

    Good point, Jack. Once that old “magnifying glass” comes out it quickly will turn into a very difficult job. At SFS we call it “working below the Base-line” and that is a terrible place to be!

    Steve

    PS The traumatized emotions of a restoration client make this even more difficult. Go to our “Special Reports” section to download my latest Report on “Recession Proofing Your Restoration Business”. I address at length the Emotional Dynamics of the loss.

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